Author Topic: Outside loop in a cross wind  (Read 1931 times)

Offline AllanH

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Outside loop in a cross wind
« on: 20, October 2013, 09:23:58 AM »
I was practising yesterday with my Angel 50 in a gusty crosswind blowing over my right shoulder. The outside loop was causing me real problems. By trying to maintain constant speed (i.e. with less throttle than the the more into wind legs), the flight line and wings level, the entry into the outside loop was askew to the flight line and so was my outside loop. I found flying faster reduced the problem, but it looked really rushed.


Is there something else I can try?





 




Offline Adrian Mansell

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Re: Outside loop in a cross wind
« Reply #1 on: 20, October 2013, 02:34:41 PM »
Two things:


: Whenever you fly in a cross wind, you have to roll slightly through pitch changes.  Try it with a stick model - pretend you are "crabbing" along straight and level and then pretend you have applied just elevator to go vertical.  Yes, you are vertical but, no, your wings are not perpendicular to the flight line because of the original "crab". So you have to roll as you transition.  In a loop or bunt you have to roll the whole way round...


: A slow roll in cross wind is no different to no cross wind (unless it is gusty, that is a different matter).  The model is flying straight with respect to the air around it and if you enter the roll on the correct heading you will exit it on the correct heading with no cross-wind specific corrections.  (If the wind is gusting then as the wind speed changes the model ceases to be travelling straight wrt the air around it and you need both good skill and a good model to maintain heading).

Offline wingster

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Re: Outside loop in a cross wind
« Reply #2 on: 02, January 2014, 05:22:48 PM »
When pulling to inside maneuvers roll the canopy slightly into the wind.   When pushing to outside maneuvers roll the belly into the wind.  These are usually very small inputs, just breathing on the aileron stick.   The slower you fly the more the airplane crabs into the wind and the greater input is needed.