Author Topic: soldering connectors  (Read 829 times)

Offline Joe Wotton

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soldering connectors
« on: 11, January 2018, 11:51:56 AM »
Hi,I was just wondering what soldering irons people are using?
The reason I ask is that I have a very old 100 watt iron that is fine for soldering 5.5mm connectors but recently I bought some new 6 cell lipos that came with XT90 connectors ,so decided to change the connectors on my speed controllers to standardise the connectors,the problem was that when the connector was heated to allow the solder to run it also started to melt the housing,so I wondered if there are any devices that deliver local heat quickly to avoid melting the housing?
any help would be most wecome.
Regards Joe Wotton

Offline Malcolm Harris

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #1 on: 11, January 2018, 01:29:43 PM »
Wow Joe, 100 Watt, you could solder a transatlantic cable with that!

I use an old Weller 25W iron with a 4mm chisel tip. Haven't come across any connector that can't be soldered with this.

The problem with the high wattage iron theory is that the heat from a tip transfers by radiation as well as conduction. So the large tip brought close to stuff you don't want to heat melts through radiation.

Good technique, total cleanliness and more importantly the right cored solder (non of this lead free stuff) and a moderately sized iron work well. Tin the bucket and flow a quantity of solder into it. Tin the wire and "flick" off any excess solder. Heat the bucket by inserting the tip into it and as the solder melts, simultaneously insert the wire and remove the iron.

Malcolm

Offline Phil Lewis

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #2 on: 11, January 2018, 02:52:31 PM »

Joe,


with XT (60 or 90) always have the connector you are soldering plugged in to it's opposite number and held in a vice. This prevents the terminal becoming out of line and also aids by adding more mass to heat up.


I agree with Malcolm 100 watt is far too hot, personally I use a 40 watt one maximum.


Phil

Offline Joe Wotton

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #3 on: 11, January 2018, 04:26:44 PM »
Thanks for the help guys,I will invest in a lower wattage iron (I always thought that in aerobatics you can never have too much power !!!) ;D

Offline Alan Wild

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #4 on: 11, January 2018, 05:43:22 PM »
Just to confuse things slightly,and likely heresy, here's what I use:
The flux is everflux---cleans anything,used it for 40 years,just make sure to clean it off with cellulose thinners and wash it off your hands!
Yes the flame can be a bit hot,but it's very quick, and a bit of heatshrink soon covers any slightly singed silicone lead...



Offline Mike Wood

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #5 on: 11, January 2018, 10:13:01 PM »
Hi Joe

When I last researched this I found some swear by 100W irons while others say it is way too much.

I also found that many say it is important to have a temperature controlled iron.

The ones with temperature control often have a separate base station.

I had an old 25w iron that I used successfully on electronic circuits for years but wanted something with a little
more "oomph".

I experimented with a 100W (not temperature controlled) iron and found that it got too hot
and I couldn't keep the tip nicely tinned with nice a bright solder coating. It would burn off
and quite quickly turn black.

The temperature controlled irons with a separate base station seemed a little over budget for
something I wouldn't be using every day / every week.

I settled on an Antex TCS 50W, which is temperature controlled, but it is built into the iron, so there
is no separate base station. The tip stays nice and bright and the range of tips is kept in stock at Maplin.

Hope it helps

Mike

Offline Yoda

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #6 on: 12, January 2018, 10:59:00 AM »
25W pointed tip for the small stuff (basically everything bar the connectors below).


120W Weller with 12mm chisel tip for the Emcotec 6mm connectors. I have since turned the tip down to 8mm.

Offline Mike Wood

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #7 on: 12, January 2018, 06:42:36 PM »
Hi Yoda  ;)

Just wondering if the Weller is temperature controlled?

Thanks

Mike

Offline Yoda

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #8 on: 13, January 2018, 10:32:42 AM »
Hi Mike,


No temperature control. Weller SI 120D. Great soldering iron. The supplied tip is too big really for our purposes but is usable. I believe you can get smaller tips but I just turned mine down recently to ~8mm then formed a chisel section. Dead easy and quick to do. Not used the new tip yet but it should make soldering the 6mm connectors easier.

Offline Mike Wood

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #9 on: 13, January 2018, 12:50:00 PM »
Hiya

That's interesting. I can only think that the 100W soldering iron (not temp controlled) I tired,
was just getting too.

So, if you tin the bit and leave it for a minute or two, it isn't turning black?

I don't mean just normal oxidation (dulled silver) which always happens?

Thanks

Mike
« Last Edit: 13, January 2018, 12:54:17 PM by Mike Wood »

Offline Yoda

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #10 on: 25, January 2018, 10:13:46 AM »
Hi Mike, I don't recall the solder turning black but as it is a large iron it can take a while to heat up. As soon as it is hot enough to melt the solder I start soldering but perhaps if I left it longer and let it fully heat up it would turn black. To be honest, I don't even use it once a year, but so far it has been excellent on the few occasions I have used it when soldering the Emcotec 6mm connectors.

Offline Mike Wood

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Re: soldering connectors
« Reply #11 on: 25, January 2018, 07:01:46 PM »
Thanks, I suspect that a good non temperature controlled iron, like you have, holds
a better temperature than others.

Mike